SETTLING IN:

SETTLING IN: Renae (Wotipka) Feilmeier settles into her new office at Bromm, Lindahl, Freeman-Caddy and Lausterer in Wahoo. She started at the Wahoo law firm in July. (Staff Photo by Lisa Brichacek)

WAHOO – There is a new lawyer in Wahoo. Well, Renae Feilmeier isn’t exactly new to Wahoo and she has been practicing law for more than a decade now.

But, she has recently joined the team at the law offices of Bromm, Lindahl, Freeman-Caddy and Lausterer.

The St. Wenceslaus Grade School and Wahoo High School graduate started in July and said recently she is starting to feel settled in her new office.

The Wotipka sibling is getting settled with people in the community too.

“I’ve been kind of the long lost sister,” Feilmeier joked about her Wahoo family.

Even though she came back to the area shortly after graduating college in Texas, she said working out of town at other jobs left her out of touch with the community.

After being approached by Curt Bromm to join the law firm, she decided it was time to live and work in Wahoo.

For Feilmeier, she pretty much knew from an early age she was going to be an attorney.

“I’ve known that since I was in sixth grade,” she said.

Her undergraduate work at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln put her on the career path she needed, but she said didn’t want to rush law school for a simple reason.

“After I graduated college, I knew I had zero life experience,” she said.

She got some of that experience by working before heading off to University of Texas at Austin.

After graduation in Texas, she had offers to put her law degree to use in Dallas or in Omaha.

“This is just home,” she said. “So, we came home.”

Feilmeier worked in Omaha for several years and then she became the in-house attorney for Landscapes Unlimited.

She was the only attorney for this golf course building business based in Lincoln so she said she got experience with a little bit of everything.

Feilmeier said the company had 26 corporate entities and 2,000 employees that she worked with. She worked with projects in 30 plus states, as well as in foreign countries.

“So, I never did one or two things. I did every variation of the law imaginable,” she added.

Contracts, human relations and other legal matters were on her plate. She said has worked with projects both big and small. Among her bigger projects was a successful contract negotiation with the royal family of Dubai.

She also tried to get a contract with Donald Trump’s former lawyer, Michael Cohen.

“That turned out to be the best project we walked away from,” she added.

Feilmeier said she feels really lucky to have all her past experiences.

“It was a different scale, but similar skills,” she said about comparing her corporate world work to that of family law.

Even with big projects always on her plate, she said she enjoyed the smaller scale interactions with employees and their concerns.

That entered into her decision to hang up her family law shingle.

“I love family law. I do,” she said about her first month of work at the Wahoo law firm. “I am not so much surprised, but it confirms what I expected coming in.”

Now that she is spending more time in town, she expected to get to know her hometown again too. But, she said some people don’t recognize her immediately.

“You know me, you just don’t know you know me because of my married name,” she said.

With a quick smile and easy conversation, Feilmeier shows she is still the same hometown kid.

“You get re-acquainted with people you know just because you have been here for a lifetime,” she added.

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