WAHOO – Six months after a vehicle crashed into a historic house in Wahoo, the repair project continues to push forward.

But while much of the major work has been done, Saunders County Historical Society Board Member and Hanson House Volunteer Mary Bergan said the remaining details are taking some time.

The big project right now is finding wallpaper to match the house’s Victorian era setting.

Hanson House was the home to one of Wahoo’s Five Famous Sons. Renowned music educator and Pulitzer Prize Winning Composer Howard Hanson grew up in the house at the corner of Fifth and Linden streets in Wahoo.

Hanson House was badly damaged Nov. 7 as a result of a two-vehicle crash at the intersection. The force of the collision sent one of the vehicles across the yard, over the porch and into the house.

Historical Society volunteers got to work quickly to secure the house and start taking inventory of the damages. Since then, the group has been working with repair companies and insurance companies to get the house back in order.

Saunders County Museum Curator Erin Hauser said the insurance companies are getting antsy to settle and get the project wrapped up. But, the repair process comes with a unique set of challenges.

Hanson House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The two-story Queen Anne style home was built in the 1880s. It has undergone some restoration projects over the years but has remained largely unchanged from when Hanson and his family occupied the home.

Hauser said the goal is to find wallpaper and a new rug for the room that was damaged with a pattern that would have been utilized in the late 1800s. She said the time period is a bit tricky because of when the Victorian era ended.

Queen Victoria of England died in 1901, ending what is known as the Victorian era.

“The Victorian era was ending and the Edwardian era was just starting,” she said. “It is challenging because you can see some big differences in style.”

Hauser said she has learned a lot about wall paper during this process.

Bergan agreed. She said they recently spent about four hours in Omaha combing through wallpaper books and getting assistance from the Douglas County Historical Society.

Several samples were brought back to the house and when a decision was made, they got some bad news. Bergan said they called back to the company in Omaha to place the order.

“They told us ‘We’re sorry we should have never had that book out. It’s been discontinued’,” she said.

So now, they are looking at other samples from other companies trying to find the right wallpaper.

Hauser said she is holding off a bit on purchasing the rug, in attempt to make sure it matches the wallpaper and border.

While the search for the right wallpaper trudges on, repairs have begun on two pieces of furniture damaged because of the crash.

Nate Varner, owner of Varner’s Restoration and Remodeling in Wahoo, picked up a trophy case and a secretarial hutch last week. Both pieces of furniture were along the walls in the northeast corner where the pickup entered the house.

Varner said the tricky part of a repair like this is matching the 100 year old wood. This is not something you can just go to the hardware store to get wood or parts.

He was confident, however, that he had some old wood in his storage supplies that would work for this project.

“It’s more of a challenge, but we like challenges,” Varner said.

Varner has also been tasked to repair one of the support posts on the porch that was broken. Again, it will be a challenge but he thought it could be done.

A replica of the post has been located, but Varner said because of the way it broke he thinks it can be repaired.

“I definitely want to repair that and keep the house authentic,” he said.

That’s the goal for all of those involved with repairs at Hanson House.

The process has been a bit slower than Bergan had hoped, but she is glad progress is being made.

Bergan said volunteers luckily had an inventory of the house’s contents before the crash. However, there is still a bit of an unknown as to the condition of some of the glass and breakable items in the furniture that was damaged.

“People just came and helped pack everything up,” she said. “We’ll know more once we unpack.”

A special event will be scheduled at the house once all repairs are done.

WAHOO – Six months after a vehicle crashed into a historic house in Wahoo, the repair project continues to push forward.

But while much of the major work has been done, Saunders County Historical Society Board Member and Hanson House Volunteer Mary Bergan said the remaining details are taking some time.

The big project right now is finding wallpaper to match the house’s Victorian era setting.

Hanson House was the home to one of Wahoo’s Five Famous Sons. Renowned music educator and Pulitzer Prize Winning Composer Howard Hanson grew up in the house at the corner of Fifth and Linden streets in Wahoo.

Hanson House was badly damaged Nov. 7 as a result of a two-vehicle crash at the intersection. The force of the collision sent one of the vehicles across the yard, over the porch and into the house.

Historical Society volunteers got to work quickly to secure the house and start taking inventory of the damages. Since then, the group has been working with repair companies and insurance companies to get the house back in order.

Saunders County Museum Curator Erin Hauser said the insurance companies are getting antsy to settle and get the project wrapped up. But, the repair process comes with a unique set of challenges.

Hanson House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The two-story Queen Anne style home was built in the 1880s. It has undergone some restoration projects over the years but has remained largely unchanged from when Hanson and his family occupied the home.

Hauser said the goal is to find wallpaper and a new rug for the room that was damaged with a pattern that would have been utilized in the late 1800s. She said the time period is a bit tricky because of when the Victorian era ended.

Queen Victoria of England died in 1901, ending what is known as the Victorian era.

“The Victorian era was ending and the Edwardian era was just starting,” she said. “It is challenging because you can see some big differences in style.”

Hauser said she has learned a lot about wall paper during this process.

Bergan agreed. She said they recently spent about four hours in Omaha combing through wallpaper books and getting assistance from the Douglas County Historical Society.

Several samples were brought back to the house and when a decision was made, they got some bad news. Bergan said they called back to the company in Omaha to place the order.

“They told us ‘We’re sorry we should have never had that book out. It’s been discontinued’,” she said.

So now, they are looking at other samples from other companies trying to find the right wallpaper.

Hauser said she is holding off a bit on purchasing the rug, in attempt to make sure it matches the wallpaper and border.

While the search for the right wallpaper trudges on, repairs have begun on two pieces of furniture damaged because of the crash.

Nate Varner, owner of Varner’s Restoration and Remodeling in Wahoo, picked up a trophy case and a secretarial hutch last week. Both pieces of furniture were along the walls in the northeast corner where the pickup entered the house.

Varner said the tricky part of a repair like this is matching the 100 year old wood. This is not something you can just go to the hardware store to get wood or parts.

He was confident, however, that he had some old wood in his storage supplies that would work for this project.

“It’s more of a challenge, but we like challenges,” Varner said.

Varner has also been tasked to repair one of the support posts on the porch that was broken. Again, it will be a challenge but he thought it could be done.

A replica of the post has been located, but Varner said because of the way it broke he thinks it can be repaired.

“I definitely want to repair that and keep the house authentic,” he said.

That’s the goal for all of those involved with repairs at Hanson House.

The process has been a bit slower than Bergan had hoped, but she is glad progress is being made.

Bergan said volunteers luckily had an inventory of the house’s contents before the crash. However, there is still a bit of an unknown as to the condition of some of the glass and breakable items in the furniture that was damaged.

“People just came and helped pack everything up,” she said. “We’ll know more once we unpack.”

A special event will be scheduled at the house once all repairs are done.

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